• by Drew Humphrey

     

    Have you ever participated in one of those group ice-breaker activities where you’re asked questions about far-fetched scenarios? Something like, “If you could have any superpower, what would it be?” Or, “If you were stranded on a deserted island and could only have one item with you, what would you choose?” Those questions can be fun, in large part because they’re unrealistic. Let’s face it, you’re not getting a superpower anytime soon. And you probably won’t be stranded on a deserted island this week, either. So you can answer these questions with a sense of detached lightheartedness, knowing that what you say really doesn’t matter.


  • by Drew Humphrey

     

    What do you do when you’re upset? When you find yourself in sharp disagreement with someone? When your voice doesn’t seem to be heard? Here’s one suggestion: stay in your seat.


  • by Paul Briggs

     

    Recently I was leaving my office for the day to go and pick up my family for a long-anticipated family event. I hadn’t traveled very far when I noticed a student I recognized walking toward the building on campus in which my office is located. This was a young lady we had met last year in her home country on our Asian travels. During her first year at Purdue, the Lord opened numerous doors to build a strong relationship with her.


  • by Mikel Berger

     

    I think I might have found the worst meeting request ever. A few weeks ago I taught in the Connection Hour from Nehemiah 6 as part of our series on the books of Ezra and Nehemiah. Up to this point, Nehemiah has followed in the footsteps of Ezra to rebuild and repopulate Jerusalem for the people of God. But Nehemiah wasn’t a priest like Ezra; he was a servant of the king who was right at the heart of everything (Neh. 1:11). Nehemiah heard about the struggle of his people -- God’s people -- in Jerusalem. He wept, he mourned, he fasted, and he prayed in response. And after hearing from God, he set out to Jerusalem on his rebuilding mission.