• by Abraham Cremeens

     

    What do you think of when I say the word “whole”? Maybe eating a whole pie comes to mind, or a whole carton of ice cream. Possibly, your thoughts go to money, such as a bill that is due: “I owe the whole amount!” Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about that word. It hasn’t been in the context of food or money, but as it relates to all of me, the whole person.

     


  • by Bill Davis

     

    Volumes and volumes have been penned on why the Psalms are so essential to our devotional development in the Christian life. They connect in ways that other Scripture doesn’t (not in a superior way, as 2 Tim 3:16 is clear, but still in a rather unique way). The cry of the psalmist can connect to the cry of our soul when we really aren’t sure how to think about God, let alone how to express emotion to him. Sometimes we’re not even sure what those emotions are until the example of the psalmist shows us how to think about our circumstances and gain a broader perspective. Some of the darkest, most dire moments of my life have resulted in the Psalms moving from words on a page to understanding, comfort, wisdom, hope, perspective, and life.


  • by Will Peycke

     

    Last month, two of my kids ambushed me on a Saturday night. Here’s the gist of how it started: First child: “I don’t want to go to church tomorrow. Can we skip this week?" Me: “No, we are not going to skip church this week.” Second Child: “Why not? I already know all of the Bible stories.” Yikes! Those are some big questions! Parents, how would you respond?


  • by Drew Humphrey

     

    If you’re a church member, have you ever stopped to think about how weird you are? Because you are. Very, very weird. But don’t take it personally. It really has nothing to do with you. (You’re totally normal. I promise.) Instead, the weirdness has to do with the nature of church membership itself.