• by Will Peycke

     

    Last month, two of my kids ambushed me on a Saturday night. Here’s the gist of how it started: First child: “I don’t want to go to church tomorrow. Can we skip this week?" Me: “No, we are not going to skip church this week.” Second Child: “Why not? I already know all of the Bible stories.” Yikes! Those are some big questions! Parents, how would you respond?


  • by Drew Humphrey

     

    If you’re a church member, have you ever stopped to think about how weird you are? Because you are. Very, very weird. But don’t take it personally. It really has nothing to do with you. (You’re totally normal. I promise.) Instead, the weirdness has to do with the nature of church membership itself.


  • by Abraham Cremeens

     

    Life management is good. From the early stages of childhood, our parents worked to train us in proper life management. We learned to use the restroom, to brush our teeth, to bathe, how to swim, what deodorant was, and how to limit pieces of candy. In college, we entered that interim phase of being adults while still having the care and guidance of our parents close at hand (at least with a phone call). We learned how to maintain a schedule, pace studying, keep a job, and take breaks when needed. After college, we sought a career, maintained time for relationships, and learned how to file our taxes. All the way through we learned how to manage life as responsible adults. But with that comes a certain set of dangers.


  • by Mikel Berger

     

    The parable of the Good Samaritan is one of the more commonly known passages of the Bible. You can search the Internet and pretty easily come up with dozens of recent news stories that reference a “Good Samaritan” that in some way helped out a neighbor.